naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble."this is an old image…"
"I’m not happy with that one…""this is just a sketch…"
"I did this really quickly…""there is better stuff on later pages…"It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. Be proud.

This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.
Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.
Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.
Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.
i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

naamahdarling:

howtonotsuckatgamedesign:

mirrepp:

Some harsh but very very true words

When people let me review their portfolios (on career day or open days at my game design school) I explicitly ban them from commenting during the review… …because otherwise they will follow the impulse to downplay everything I see in an attempt at being humble.

"this is an old image…"

"I’m not happy with that one…"

"this is just a sketch…"

"I did this really quickly…"

"there is better stuff on later pages…"

It’s totally understandable to have those impulses. The quality of art is not empirical data and therefore impossible to measure. Good art, bad art, it all comes down to standards. And you don’t want to come off as naive or self-absorbed.

But just don’t do it. Don’t talk yourself down in front of others. In the best case you have someone supportive who now thinks “damn, this person needs to be prepped up all the time. Do I really want to work with somebody like that” or in worst case “now that you say it, yeah, this is kinda lame/rushed/unfinished/lazy, go away.”

You can only submit what you have. If that is not enough, then it’s not enough. Your attitude will not change that. But if it is enough, you can do serious harm by not being confident of who you are now.

This means appreciating what you are able to do right now and have a clear vision of what you want to learn, be confident that you will learn it in time. 

Be proud.




This is really important.  Eliminate this urge.  Eliminate it professionally, when having contact with people in a position to buy your work.  Eliminate it socially, when you just share your work for fun.  Destroy this urge as thoroughly as you possibly can.

Because when you have done that, you’ll find that you feel at least 25% less shitty about your own work.  You lose the urge to do it.  You stop reinforcing those negative thoughts, and they retreat.  They may never go away completely (although they might!) but this is good practice for ignoring those thoughts flat-out.

Don’t shit-talk yourself.  Even if you can’t be SO PROUD, don’t ever try to influence anyone’s opinion toward your work in the negative.

Try to love your work.  Try to see what you learned from each piece, even if it’s a failure.  If you feel that you learned nothing, appreciate the fact that just spending time on it is honing your skills and giving you valuable practice.

i used to be super not-confident in my own work.  When I stopped pointing out the flaws in my own stuff, I felt better about it almost immediately.

(via fourteenery)

neil-gaiman:

chrisriddellblog:

Also just arrived!

Quickly. Reserve your copies. They will be out in the UK and Australia/NZ only, in about two weeks’ time. And dear lord, they are beautiful….

This is so gorgeous! Sleeping Beauty and Snow White fused with a feminist twist and amazing artwork is what I am here for.

neil-gaiman:

chrisriddellblog:

Also just arrived!

Quickly. Reserve your copies. They will be out in the UK and Australia/NZ only, in about two weeks’ time. And dear lord, they are beautiful….

This is so gorgeous! Sleeping Beauty and Snow White fused with a feminist twist and amazing artwork is what I am here for.

For anyone seeking to set a habit, I know very well how difficult that can be. I’ve recently downloaded an app called “Don’t Break the Chain!” that is actually quite simple but very effective for me so far. I’ve set up a couple self-care routines that I struggle with on a daily basis, and the motivation of keeping up the chain has been a big help! The best part is, the longer the chain gets, the stronger the motivation is to keep it going without a break. You can do this without an app with a regular calendar, too, by putting an x on each day, though it is nice how the app tallies the days for you and sets a reminder. For doodlers, I think it could be fun to get a physical calendar and draw a bit of art in the squares when you complete your task. Then at the end of the month your calendar page is covered in cool designs!

I know everyone is different and for some people, this might not do any good, but I wanted to share it anyways because I personally find it to be a less overwhelming workaround than most task managers (they want you to do everything all at once all the time, or at least that’s how I feel when I try to use them).

I really like Gervasio Troche's work, so many of their pieces make me stop and then smile.

I really like Gervasio Troche's work, so many of their pieces make me stop and then smile.

(via fourteenery)

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.
The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:
“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”
And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:
“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”
Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:
“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”
But Officer Thomas did have one request:
“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”
And guess what? The story gets even better.
After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.
And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.
She started crying when he told her:
“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”
And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.
Source


I N S T I N C T

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.

The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:

“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”

And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:

“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”

Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:

“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”

But Officer Thomas did have one request:

“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”

And guess what? The story gets even better.

After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.

And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.

She started crying when he told her:

“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”

And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.

Source

I N S T I N C T

(Source: fightingforanimals, via we-are-all-survivors-somehow)

"When women get behind something, their sheer numbers and passion force it into the mainstream. That’s why you can name the actor who plays that werewolf kid in “Twilight” and probably sing at least the chorus to one Justin Bieber song. What do tween boys like? I have no clue. Sports? Probably sports."

read this read this read this (via meggannn)

(via goddammitstacey)

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

kiarasnaps:

Laverne: Nicole, does your belief system now change, in which you now know you don’t need him to be there? 
Nicole: No. I think what happens is it turns into less a conversation about my blackness and more about relating to humanity, because that’s really what we’re trying to do. We’re just realizing that people are capable of doing it. We’re underestimating people because people said we weren’t viable. 
[x]

We are enough.

(via blackgirlstalking)

ninjakato:

ruaniamh:

kaymonstar:

I keep laughing.

HERE COMES THE AIRPLANE

"EAT THE FUCKING BISCUIT MEATBAG!!!"
[Image: Robotic hand carefully lifts food, move it down a little so that it is almost in line with a mannequin’s open mouth, and repeatedly smashing food against mannequin’s cheek.]

ninjakato:

ruaniamh:

kaymonstar:

I keep laughing.

HERE COMES THE AIRPLANE

"EAT THE FUCKING BISCUIT MEATBAG!!!"

[Image: Robotic hand carefully lifts food, move it down a little so that it is almost in line with a mannequin’s open mouth, and repeatedly smashing food against mannequin’s cheek.]

(Source: quevidamastriste, via charminglyantiquated)

How to help out your favorite artists when you don't have any money

ginabiggs:

katedrawscomics:

3liza:

I post something like this about once a year, because I get a lot of messages from people who enjoy my art but feel guilty about not buying things from my store or subscribing on Patreon or getting things from my wishlist, etc. You really don’t need to do ANY…

All great tips!

Is One of the Most-Cited Statistics About Sex Work Wrong? - Atlantic Mobile

If you’ve followed public debate over sex work and trafficking in recent decades, you’ve probably seen some variation on this sentence: “The average age of entry into prostitution is 13.”

Statistics have a reputation for being dull, but this one packs a punch. In only nine words, it conjures up a story worthy of Dickens. Hear that statistic, and you can’t help but imagine the faces of children, as fragile and guileless as porcelain dolls; you imagine, too, the fear on those faces, and the violence that will be done to them to feed the greed and perverted desires of figures lurking in the shadows. Those nine words tell you that this is not a story that is the exception, but rather, the norm in the industry. A person would have to have a rare degree of monstrousness not to feel their heart break, just a little, on hearing such cruelty described so starkly.

Except for one thing: There is little basis for the claim that 13—or 12, as is sometimes asserted—is the age that most sex workers begin working in prostitution.

It’s hard to pin down where exactly the age-of-entry claim originated, partly because it’s so often repeated without a citation or context, but also because it’s become such a ubiquitous part of sexual politics. “I can’t really remember a time when I didn’t see it used, so I think it’s been in circulation for quite a while,” says Audacia Ray, of the Red Umbrella Project in New York. “And it’s definitely used really broadly and without citation.”

Most organizations, if they refer to a source at all, reference a study released in 2001: The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in the U. S., Canada and Mexico, by Richard J. Estes and Neil A. Weiner.


As such studies go, it was a pretty extensive one. Estes and Weiner covered 17 major cities in the United States, four in Canada, and seven in Mexico. But the data samples they wrangled up with weren’t very large. They sent out 1,130 surveys to various organizations that dealt with abused and exploited children in the target cities. Of those, 288 came back completed—a 25.5 percent response rate. Most of the organizations just didn’t have the information that Estes and Weiner were looking for: “Difficulty in accessing information concerning the number of sexually exploited children in their care was one of the factors cited by many agencies for not completing the formal questionnaire,” the report says.

They also did interviews directly with children, both on the streets and in the custody of law enforcement or social services. Here, the information collected was even sparser; in 17 major U.S. cities, they interviewed a total of 210 children.

The age-of-entry statistic seems to originate in a quote on page 92 of the report, summarizing the data from those 210 interviews:

Average age of first intercourse for the children we interviewed was 12 years for the boys (N=63) and 13 years for the girls (N=107). The age range of entry into prostitution for the boys, including gay and transgender boys, was somewhat younger than that of the girls, i.e., 11-13 years vs. 12-14 years, respectively. The average age of first intercourse among minority boys and girls was younger than that of the non-minority youth we interviewed, i.e., 10-11 years of age for minority boys and 11-12 years of age for minority girls.

Since then, that single paragraph has morphed into something much shorter and much different. The Estes and Weiner passage isn’t a conclusion about sex workers at large, or even abused and exploited children; it is a description only of their sample group. But for almost 15 years, governmental and non-profit organizations have turned to it to make broader claims about people who work in the sex trades and how they came to be there.

Most current government and nonprofit policies on sex work define their goals as “rescue,” which makes perfect sense if the age-of-entry statistic is central to your understanding of the sex industry. Child abuse and trafficking are crises that require certain types of interventions. But these crimes do not characterize the sex industry more generally. In reality, many sex workers come into the industry as adults and without coercion, often because of economic necessity. By seeing the sex industry through the lens of the misleading age-of-entry statistic, we overlook the people who are most affected by discussions about sex work—the workers themselves.

(Source: clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead, via we-are-all-survivors-somehow)