I really like Gervasio Troche's work, so many of their pieces make me stop and then smile.

I really like Gervasio Troche's work, so many of their pieces make me stop and then smile.

(via fourteenery)

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.
The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:
“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”
And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:
“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”
Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:
“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”
But Officer Thomas did have one request:
“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”
And guess what? The story gets even better.
After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.
And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.
She started crying when he told her:
“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”
And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.
Source


I N S T I N C T

askulloffoxes:

fightingforanimals:

The woman on the left is a mother from Miami who was so desperate to feed her hungry family that she was trying to steal a lot of food.

The woman on the right is Miami-Dade County Police Officer Vicki Thomas. Officer Thomas was about to arrest Jessica Robles but changed her mind at the last minute.

Instead of arresting her, she bought Robles $100 worth of groceries:

“I made the decision to buy her some groceries because arresting her wasn’t going to solve the problem with her children being hungry.”

And there’s no denying they were hungry. Robles’ 12 year old daughter started crying when she told local TV station WSVN about how dire their situation was:

“[It’s] not fun to see my brother in the dirt hungry, asking for food, and we have to tell him, ‘There is nothing here.’”

Officer Thomas says she has no question that what she did was right:

“To see them go through the bags when we brought them in, it was like Christmas. That $100 to me was worth it.”

But Officer Thomas did have one request:

“The only thing I asked of her is, when she gets on her feet, that she help someone else out. And she said she would.”

And guess what? The story gets even better.

After word got out about what happened people donated another $700 for Jessica Robles to spend at the grocery store.

And then best of all a local business owner invited her in for an interview and ended up hiring her on the spot as a customer service rep.

She started crying when he told her:

“There’s no words how grateful I am that you took your time and helped somebody out. Especially somebody like me.”

And to think it all started with one veteran police officer trusting her “instinct” instead of going “by the book”.

Source

I N S T I N C T

(Source: fightingforanimals, via we-are-all-survivors-somehow)

"When women get behind something, their sheer numbers and passion force it into the mainstream. That’s why you can name the actor who plays that werewolf kid in “Twilight” and probably sing at least the chorus to one Justin Bieber song. What do tween boys like? I have no clue. Sports? Probably sports."

read this read this read this (via meggannn)

(via goddammitstacey)

luvyourselfsomeesteem:

kiarasnaps:

Laverne: Nicole, does your belief system now change, in which you now know you don’t need him to be there? 
Nicole: No. I think what happens is it turns into less a conversation about my blackness and more about relating to humanity, because that’s really what we’re trying to do. We’re just realizing that people are capable of doing it. We’re underestimating people because people said we weren’t viable. 
[x]

We are enough.

(via blackgirlstalking)

ninjakato:

ruaniamh:

kaymonstar:

I keep laughing.

HERE COMES THE AIRPLANE

"EAT THE FUCKING BISCUIT MEATBAG!!!"
[Image: Robotic hand carefully lifts food, move it down a little so that it is almost in line with a mannequin’s open mouth, and repeatedly smashing food against mannequin’s cheek.]

ninjakato:

ruaniamh:

kaymonstar:

I keep laughing.

HERE COMES THE AIRPLANE

"EAT THE FUCKING BISCUIT MEATBAG!!!"

[Image: Robotic hand carefully lifts food, move it down a little so that it is almost in line with a mannequin’s open mouth, and repeatedly smashing food against mannequin’s cheek.]

(Source: quevidamastriste, via charminglyantiquated)

How to help out your favorite artists when you don't have any money

ginabiggs:

katedrawscomics:

3liza:

I post something like this about once a year, because I get a lot of messages from people who enjoy my art but feel guilty about not buying things from my store or subscribing on Patreon or getting things from my wishlist, etc. You really don’t need to do ANY…

All great tips!

Is One of the Most-Cited Statistics About Sex Work Wrong? - Atlantic Mobile

If you’ve followed public debate over sex work and trafficking in recent decades, you’ve probably seen some variation on this sentence: “The average age of entry into prostitution is 13.”

Statistics have a reputation for being dull, but this one packs a punch. In only nine words, it conjures up a story worthy of Dickens. Hear that statistic, and you can’t help but imagine the faces of children, as fragile and guileless as porcelain dolls; you imagine, too, the fear on those faces, and the violence that will be done to them to feed the greed and perverted desires of figures lurking in the shadows. Those nine words tell you that this is not a story that is the exception, but rather, the norm in the industry. A person would have to have a rare degree of monstrousness not to feel their heart break, just a little, on hearing such cruelty described so starkly.

Except for one thing: There is little basis for the claim that 13—or 12, as is sometimes asserted—is the age that most sex workers begin working in prostitution.

It’s hard to pin down where exactly the age-of-entry claim originated, partly because it’s so often repeated without a citation or context, but also because it’s become such a ubiquitous part of sexual politics. “I can’t really remember a time when I didn’t see it used, so I think it’s been in circulation for quite a while,” says Audacia Ray, of the Red Umbrella Project in New York. “And it’s definitely used really broadly and without citation.”

Most organizations, if they refer to a source at all, reference a study released in 2001: The Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in the U. S., Canada and Mexico, by Richard J. Estes and Neil A. Weiner.


As such studies go, it was a pretty extensive one. Estes and Weiner covered 17 major cities in the United States, four in Canada, and seven in Mexico. But the data samples they wrangled up with weren’t very large. They sent out 1,130 surveys to various organizations that dealt with abused and exploited children in the target cities. Of those, 288 came back completed—a 25.5 percent response rate. Most of the organizations just didn’t have the information that Estes and Weiner were looking for: “Difficulty in accessing information concerning the number of sexually exploited children in their care was one of the factors cited by many agencies for not completing the formal questionnaire,” the report says.

They also did interviews directly with children, both on the streets and in the custody of law enforcement or social services. Here, the information collected was even sparser; in 17 major U.S. cities, they interviewed a total of 210 children.

The age-of-entry statistic seems to originate in a quote on page 92 of the report, summarizing the data from those 210 interviews:

Average age of first intercourse for the children we interviewed was 12 years for the boys (N=63) and 13 years for the girls (N=107). The age range of entry into prostitution for the boys, including gay and transgender boys, was somewhat younger than that of the girls, i.e., 11-13 years vs. 12-14 years, respectively. The average age of first intercourse among minority boys and girls was younger than that of the non-minority youth we interviewed, i.e., 10-11 years of age for minority boys and 11-12 years of age for minority girls.

Since then, that single paragraph has morphed into something much shorter and much different. The Estes and Weiner passage isn’t a conclusion about sex workers at large, or even abused and exploited children; it is a description only of their sample group. But for almost 15 years, governmental and non-profit organizations have turned to it to make broader claims about people who work in the sex trades and how they came to be there.

Most current government and nonprofit policies on sex work define their goals as “rescue,” which makes perfect sense if the age-of-entry statistic is central to your understanding of the sex industry. Child abuse and trafficking are crises that require certain types of interventions. But these crimes do not characterize the sex industry more generally. In reality, many sex workers come into the industry as adults and without coercion, often because of economic necessity. By seeing the sex industry through the lens of the misleading age-of-entry statistic, we overlook the people who are most affected by discussions about sex work—the workers themselves.

(Source: clarawebbwillcutoffyourhead, via we-are-all-survivors-somehow)

amuseoffyre:

clockadile:

iygrittenothing:

#I DON’T THINK YOU UNDERSTAND HOW MUCH I LOVE ZUKO AND HIS CHARACTER ARC

My favourite thing about this, is that he goes back to his father, and holds him accountable for his actions. He’s thought he was in the wrong for years. That it was his fault he lost his honour. To see him come to this understanding that he was a child and his father was the responsible party was amazing.

I can’t even think of any other animated kids shows where the abuser is called out on their abuse as openly and directly as he was in this show. And don’t even start me on the importance of them showing that a male child can be the victim of abuse by a male parent. That’s a demographic that so often gets brushed aside and they get told to “man up” or in this case “act like a Prince.” And Zuko gets to stand up and say “I AM a Prince. You’re the one who was wrong.”

(Source: youngjustices9, via vintageravenclaw)

modmad:

alpha621tutorialblog:

sunshinedorkface:

I have Keratoconus which is a genetic condition that causes the cornea to turn cone shaped. It makes it hard to see, because bright lights form halo effects, obscuring the vision, and making it difficult to read, and in my case, draw. The day before my birthday, I went to a specialist, who gave me three options; Cross linking eye surgery, (which is still considered experimental in the United States, and not covered by insurance) Intact lenses (also not covered by insurance) or complete cornea transplants (Which is covered by insurance, but much riskier than the other two listed). 

Although there is some hope, since the Intacts is currently going through trial runs and studies for it to be approved by most insurances, I will learn by october, if I will be an acceptible participant for the study, and receive the intacts at either a reduced price, or not pay at all.

But, worse case scenerio, I will have to pay $5000-9000 per eye.

I cannot afford that, on my walmart salary. My family is barely skating by with what we have, and we still struggle every month to make ends meet. There is absolutely no way we would be able to pay for this surgery.

And, that really scares me. 

As an artist, and a writer, I depend so much on my eyes. Keratoconus is not curable, and will only worsten, if they go untreated. I NEED this surgery, but I can’t pay for it, with the few hundred bucks I get from putting up with walmart customers.

So, I turn to you, Tumblr. This is very hard for me to do, since I was raised to believe that if someone can work for their money, they very well should, and reserve the free help to the people who truly cannot help themselves. But, if you feel like you can, and want to donate, please feel free to send that money to my Paypal, at maryzolgarcia90@yahoo.com

If you want to help in another way, please spread my Commissioning Info or feel free to commission a piece of artwork from me directly by sending me an ask here, note me at my Dev.artor Email me your information at the same Email stated for my Paypal.

Simply re-blogging this really helps as well.

Thank you for taking your time for reading this out.

I’ll share this before I close the blog because it makes me sad.

I’m currently recovering from acute tendonitis, which is a nightmare for an artist, but it is absolutely nothing compared to an eye-related problem like this; if you have the money to spare please consider helping or signal boost so that someone else can!

Please reblog this even if you can’t donate right now.

"In general, I think we need to move away from the premise that being a good person is a fixed immutable characteristic and shift towards seeing being good as a practice. And it is a practice that we carry out by engaging with our imperfections. We need to shift towards thinking that being a good person is like being a clean person. Being a clean person is something you maintain and work on every day.We don’t assume ‘I am a clean person therefore I don’t need to brush my teeth.’ When someone suggests to us that we have something stuck in our teeth we don’t say to them ‘What do you mean I have something stuck in my teeth—but I’m a clean person?!’"

Jay Smooth in his TED speech “how I learned to stop worrying and love discussing race” (via tropicanastasia)

Jay Smooth almost always a reblog

(via unrational)

Dude nailed it. We all need to work at being good. Even if we think we are.

(via jasmined)

(via we-are-all-survivors-somehow)